logo  navy   army

< RETURN TO A-Z

This page contains the records of the person you have selected. Information has been verified and a signature gained from the living next of kin.


All data is offered in good faith. Should you feel any information is inaccurate or incomplete or perhaps you have extra information which could be included please contact info@safn.org.uk

 


Name John Arkley
Nick Name  
Last Known Address 6 Mulgrave Street, Monkwermouth.
Family Circumstances Single.

Unit of Service Army,  16th & 9th Bn Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment.
Number and Rank 4/8145. Acting Lance Corporal.
Date & Place of Death 3rd May 1917. France / Flanders
Grave Location
(if known)
Not Known
Where Commemorated
(if known)

Arras War Memorial. France.

Below are the details of 3 different local locations where John is commemorated.

(Courtesy of the North East War Memorials Project).

St Peters

St Peters

J.L. Thompsons Memorial


Details of any Medals, conflict, training or operations which the deceased had participated in during service.

John was recorded as serving in the Balkans and also the Western Front.  There is evidence that he served with the 16th and the 9th Battalions according to the record books below.

John was awarded the Following War Medals:

     British War Medal                                   Victory Medal                                             1914 - 1915 Star.

                                                                    

 

 

Other general information. online links, images etc.

John was born in 1895 in Monkweramouth, Sunderland

He worked as a Apprentice Rivet Heater at J.L. Thompson's Shipyard.

There is no known grave but he is recorded in the Commonwealth War Graves Registers.

John had an older Brother called James who also died in the First world War. Below is a link to James entry.

JamesArkley

 

Below : The 1901 Census showing John living in Normanby Street where he was born

 

Name:

John Arkley

Age:

6

Estimated birth year:

abt 1895

Relation to Head:

Son

Gender:

Male

Father:

James Arkley

Mother:

Mary Arkley

Birth Place:

Monkwearmouth, Durham,England

Civil Parish:

Sunderland

Household Members:

Name

Age

James Arkley

38

Mary Arkley

34

James Arkley

13

Linean Arkley

12

William Arkley

10

John Arkley

6

Thomas Arkley

3

Robert Arkley

2

 

Below: The 1911 Census showing John working as an apprentice.

Name:

John Arkley

Age in 1911:

16

Estimated birth year:

abt 1895

Relation to Head:

Son

Gender:

Male

Birth Place:

Monk Wearmouth

Civil Parish:

Sunderland

Household Members:

Name

Age

James Arkley

48

Mary Arkley

44

James Arkley

23

Lilian Arkley

22

William Arkley

20

John Arkley

16

Thomas Arkley

13

Robert Arkley

12

Andrew Arkley

9

Joseph Arkley

7

Joseph Maughan

27

Thomas Maughan

20

 

 

Below are the War Department records of Johns Service and Medal entitlement.

 

 

Below are the details of the Cemetary and W.D. Papers referring to Johns commemoration.

 

 

 

Cemetery Details

 

ARRAS MEMORIAL

Casualty Record Detail

Casualty Record Detail

1234567

Location Information

The Arras Memorial is in the Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery, which is in the Boulevard du General de Gaulle in the western part of the town of Arras. The cemetery is near the Citadel, approximately 2 kms due west of the railway station.

The GPS coordinates for the cemetery are 50.28670, 2.76057
 

Visiting Information

NOVEMBER 2015 - After 11 November 2015, work will be start on Bay 10 (replacement of 16 engraved panels) of the Arras Memorial. Bay 10 will be closed to the public as from 12-13 November 2015 for a period of 4 weeks to erect the scaffolding and to carry out the necessary remedial works.
Similarly we will start the re-engraving of Bays 6 and 7 on the 6th of January for a period of two months until the end of February 2016. The area will be closed to the public during this work. A temporary register box will be put up at the central entrance behind the Cross of Sacrifice during this period.


Wheelchair access to the memorial is possible via an alternative entrance at the rear of Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery.
 

Historical Information

The French handed over Arras to Commonwealth forces in the spring of 1916 and the system of tunnels upon which the town is built were used and developed in preparation for the major offensive planned for April 1917.

The Commonwealth section of the FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY was begun in March 1916, behind the French military cemetery established earlier. It continued to be used by field ambulances and fighting units until November 1918. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields and from two smaller cemeteries in the vicinity.

The cemetery contains over 2,650 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 10 of which are unidentified. The graves in the French military cemetery were removed after the war to other burial grounds and the land they had occupied was used for the construction of the Arras Memorial and Arras Flying Services Memorial.
 

The adjacent ARRAS MEMORIAL commemorates almost 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, the eve of the Advance to Victory, and have no known grave. The most conspicuous events of this period were the Arras offensive of April-May 1917, and the German attack in the spring of 1918. Canadian and Australian servicemen killed in these operations are commemorated by memorials at Vimy and Villers-Bretonneux. A separate memorial remembers those killed in the Battle of Cambrai in 1917.

The adjacent ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL commemorates almost 1,000 airmen of the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Flying Corps, and the Royal Air Force, either by attachment from other arms of the forces of the Commonwealth or by original enlistment, who were killed on the whole Western Front and who have no known grave.

During the Second World War, Arras was occupied by United Kingdom forces headquarters until the town was evacuated on 23 May 1940. Arras then remained in German hands until retaken by Commonwealth and Free French forces on 1 September 1944. The 1939-1945 War burials number 8 and comprise 3 soldiers and 4 airmen from the United Kingdom and 1 entirely unidentified casualty. Located between the 2 special memorials of the 1914-1918 War is the special memorial commemorating an officer of the United States Army Air Force, who died during the 1939-1945 War. This special memorial, is inscribed with the words "Believed to be buried in this cemetery". In addition, there are 30 war graves of other nationalities, most of them German.

Both cemetery and memorial were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, with sculpture by Sir William Reid Dick. The memorial was unveiled by Lord Trenchard, Marshal of the Royal Air Force on the 31 July 1932 (originally it had been scheduled for 15 May, but due to the sudden death of French President Doumer, as a mark of respect, the ceremony was postponed until July).

 

Below are the details of the service of the battalions where John is believed to have served.

 

9th (Service) Battalion
25.08.1914 Formed at York as part of the first New Army (K1) and moved to Belton Park, Grantham as part of the 32nd Brigade of the 11th Division.
April 1915 Moved to Witley Camp, Godalming
03.07.1915 Embarked for Gallipoli from Liverpool via Mudros.
06.08.1915 Landed at Suvla Bay and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army including;
The Battle of Sari Bair.
20.12.1915 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
07.02.1916 Arrived in Egypt and took over part of the Suez Canal defences.
01.07.1916 Moved to France landing at Marseilles and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The capture of the Wundt-Werk, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Thiepval. 
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle. 
13.11.1917 Absorbed 400 men of all ranks from the Yorkshire Hussars to become the 9th (Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry) Battalion.
1918
The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Quant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre. 
11.11.1918 Ended the war Bettignies north of Maubeuge, France.

 

 

16th (Service) Battalion (1st Bradford) & 18th (Service) Battalion (2nd Bradford)
Sept 1914 The 16th formed and the 18th Formed on 22.01.1915 at Bradford by the Lord mayor and the City.
Jan 1915 Moved to Skipton and then Ripon as part of the 93rd Brigade of the 31st Division
10.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Fovant, Salisbury Plain.
Dec 1915 Moved to Egypt and took over a section on the Suez Canal defences.
Mar 1916 Moved to France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Ancre. 
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Capture of Oppy Wood. 
07.12.1917 The 16th amalgamated with the 17th Battalion to form the 15/17th Battalion.
15.02.1918 The 16th disbanded in France.
15.12.1918 The 17th disbanded in France.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


All data is offered in good faith. Should you feel any information is inaccurate or incomplete please contact sunderlandafn@gmail.com

filler